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New Malware Threats Continue to Change the Game

Pathlock
August 8, 2016

New Malware Threats Continue to Change the Game

All it takes is one click on an email, a visit to the wrong web site, or using an infected USB drive that was handed to you as a giveaway. But malware continues to evolve, becoming even more dangerous and harder to detect until it’s too late. Below are the latest malware threats: Funtenna: How do you protect yourself from malware when it doesn’t even need to be installed? Funtenna actually utilizes your office equipment and transforms it into listening devices for spying. This malware uses circuits available on the majority of devices along with radio frequency waves to spy on a company. Hackers don’t even need to gain access to the machine in order to accomplish this. Old macros are new again for Microsoft Office: DOCM files are being sent with new macros that are able to avoid file type detection by Microsoft Office. This isn’t a new approach but the new macros are spreading quickly. Updated versions of the Gozi malware: Global financial brands such as PayPal, CitiDirect BE, and ING Bank are being targeted by Gozi according to buguroo Labs. When an infected user starts a transaction, Gozi sends its server the information, and then carries out fraudulent transactions. The user receives an alert to enter their security key to complete their transfer, but in reality, they are authorizing the fraudulent one. Ranscam: Once Ranscam is installed, it wreaks havoc on a system, deleting files and changing system settings. But it claims to have hidden the files requiring a ransom to be paid in order to unlock them. If the user pays the fee, they’re files are still gone and there’s no recovery. Worst yet, Ranscam uses a fake payment verification process that results in a transaction failure notice even though the payment went through. This is to try to get a user to pay again. And we mentioned at the beginning of this blog about infected USB drives. According to ThreatPost, Black Hat USA conducted an experiment by leaving USB drives with phone-home capabilities around a university. 48% of the drives were plugged into a computer and the test files were opened. 20% of the files were opened within the first hour of the drives being placed. The dangers of malware are clear and they are getting hard to detect. But there is a better approach to protecting your company’s most valuable assets. Start by clicking here to learn how to manage cyber threats from the top down.